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Welcome to Neuroscience!

Dr. Tuan Tran
Neuroscience Program Director
Office: Rawl Building, Room 225
Email: trant@ecu.edu or neuroscience@ecu.edu
Faculty Webpage: www.ecu.edu/psyc/trant


Neuroscience is a discipline primed for the challenges affecting human health within the 21st century. It provides better understanding of brain function through cutting-edge research and clinical practice. Numerous inquiries about how the brain works date back to the dawn of civilization, however, this academic discipline is still in its infancy. Explaining the brain-behavior relationship is a central tenet which has been described as one of the last frontiers in the biological sciences by renowned neuroscientist and Nobel Prize Winner, Dr. Eric Kandel. It is challenging, exciting, rewarding, and interdisciplinary.

We offer an undergraduate major (leading to BA or BS degrees) and minor that are concentrations in the Multidisciplinary Studies Program. This program is housed in the Department of Psychology and is 1 of 19 interdisciplinary studies concentrations within Thomas Harriott College of Arts and Sciences. The concentration is designed to provide students with knowledge and research skills that will help prepare them for a career in diverse neuroscience areas (psychopharmacology, neuropsychology, neurophysiology, neurotoxicology, neuropathology, and many more!) and a wide variety of related fields such as medicine, dentistry, and other health-related professions. Indeed, many of the course requirements in the curriculum overlap with the undergraduate courses required by most graduate schools and medical schools. The curriculum includes a strong core of biology, chemistry, physics, and psychology courses, mentored-research experience in scientific laboratories, a two-semester senior thesis, a two-semester senior capstone sequence, and diverse electives (spanning those disciplines). For prospective students, we encourage you to learn more about the program, our contributing research faculty, students, and their achievements. For our alumni, we appreciate your passion for neuroscience and please keep in touch! I look forward to hearing from you.


Neuroscience News

  • Immune cells may heal bleeding brain after strokes
    By studying rodents, researchers showed that instead of attacking germs, some neutrophils may help heal the brain after an intracerebral hemorrhage, a form of stroke caused by ruptured blood vessels. The study suggests that two neutrophil-related proteins may play critical roles in protecting the brain from stroke-induced damage and could be used as treatments for intracerebral hemorrhage.
  • Newly ID'd role of major Alzheimer's gene suggests possible therapeutic target
    A new role has been identified for the major Alzheimer's risk factor ApoE4, suggesting that targeting the protein may help treat the disease. Researchers show that ApoE4 exacerbates the brain damage caused by toxic tangles of a different Alzheimer's-associated protein: tau. In the absence of ApoE, tau tangles did very little harm to brain cells.

NeuroscienceNews.com